Do You Feel Lucky?

Bonus post!!!  Who doesn’t like an internet meme? In the land of blogs and Twitter, a meme taking the cyber-world by storm is a fun version of “Tag!” although I think it is better to shout “Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!” myself.

Anyhoo, my dear friend and the kick-ass writer, Bill Cameron,* tagged me in The Lucky 7 Game which is the writer’s version of playing tag. And just like the game of tag you played as a whipper-snapper where you ran all about getting breathless and having a grand old time, I giggled to see I’d been tagged. And then, my critique partner, Jen Stayrook, tagged me too! Holy schnickies, I had better go buy a lottery ticket because I am feeling lucky, very lucky indeed.

*I love Bill’s latest book in a major fan-girl way and not just because he uses my name in it. I cannot wait until it’s published. 🙂

The rules are simple:

If you’re tagged, you have to do the following:

  1. Go to page 7 or 77 in your current manuscript
  2. Go to line 7
  3. Copy down the next seven lines/sentences as they are – no cheating
  4. Tag 7 other authors

So, for the first ever time, I’m sharing with the whole freaking world (or at least the minuscule part of it reading this here blog) my WIP (work in progress). It is in its third draft which is to say it is much improved from its first draft and miles to go until it is ready for the whole freaking world to read the whole freaking thing. (I’m on my third cup of coffee, why do you ask?)

My novel, Bent Not Broken, is a historical young adult novel with three protagonists. Since I was tagged twice, I’m doing both options in step one – here are excerpts from page 7 and page 77.

On page 7, Anna is talking.

“When she sits back down beside me, I notice how tired and old she looks. A daily cocktail of booze, cigarettes, and pills has a way of wearing a body down faster than out. It’s a long and slow way of killing one’s self.

Excusing myself, I head into the bathroom. The fluorescent bulbs flicker and dance in the mirror. I run my tongue over my teeth and squint at my reflection. Nothing’s broken, only a bit loose and swollen. I’ll live.”

And on page 77, Vera says,

“He puts down the pencil. His slim arms raise and he caresses the broken keyboard like a lover. The piano was surely beautiful once, but now its keys look like the mouth of an apple-faced woman begging from a doorway. It sits there, legless. Its wood is scarred and battered. A broken shadow of itself, the piano balances on wooden boxes that once crated machine parts and vegetables. It too begs for our attention.”

 Well, there  ya go. Now to the less painful part of the process, sharing with you seven writers I think you should read more of…

Oh crumb-bum. How to choose, how to choose…. Oh I know, I’ll pick the last seven books/WIPs/short stories or blogs I’ve read.

Rae Carson

Damien Walters Grintalis

Ilsa Bick

Myra McEntire (Bill also tagged Myra – give us a second quote please Myra, please.)

Sarah Ockler

Jen Stayrook (Also been tagged, give us page 77 of “Spring of Innocents” pretty please!)

Everett Maroon

Whew. How much fun is this? Well, for a writer who wants everybody to read, read, and read some more, LOTS.

Seriously, this is a fun way to get people reading more stuff that might not typically find it’s way on your proverbial book shelves. And also, a fun reason to get lucky. *wink*

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Coffee Across Washington

This is the fourth post in a five-part guest post series.

Everett Maroon is a writer of speculative fiction, pop culture commentary, and memoir in Washington State. He has a B.A. in English from Syracuse University and went through an English literature master’s program there. A member of the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association, he was a finalist in their 2010 literary contest for memoir. Everett writes about writing and his adjustment to living in the Northwest at transplantportation.com. He blogs at I Fry Mine in Butter.com, and at Bitch Magazine. Everett also has had short stories published in SPLIT Quarterly and in Twisted Dreams Magazine.

Photo taken by the authorI spend a lot of time in coffee shops—too much time, probably. As the youngest in a large, noisy family, I now need rambunctious places so I can filter out the distractions and focus on writing. Call it a counter intuitive working process. Continue reading